Peak Communicators
July 31, 2018

Langley Memorial Hospital Auxiliary: Apparently small story packs huge punch

When Langley Memorial Hospital opened in 1948, it was, essentially, a country hospital.

Langley was a small town, dwarfed by Vancouver and its neighbouring communities.

No one could have seen its exploding population coming.

Seventy years later, the hospital announced that it would build a new emergency department. The Langley Memorial Hospital Foundation launched a multi-million-dollar fundraising campaign in May, and enlisted Peak’s help.

It’s been an outstanding project. The new emerg is needed, badly. The current facility is too small, too cramped, awkwardly designed and, as you can imagine, isn’t capable of handing the new Langley. We were able to draw attention to this critical undertaking, and felt we served a small but important role in the campaign launch.

At the initial news event, two big donors were announced. One family gave $2 million, and then a $5-million donor was unveiled. The assembled guests were wowed. Even the usually skeptical media was impressed – and we were able to attract media that wouldn’t normally be interested in a regional hospital.

Six weeks after the launch, we were at it again. The foundation was set to name its latest donor – the Langley Memorial Hospital Auxiliary. What could we do with that?

This is where effort needs to fight perception. After all, at a glance, we had a vision of what a hospital auxiliary is. They’re those blue-haired ladies, right? The ones who give you directions when you arrive at a hospital, who run the gift shop that has all the stuffies and balloons. Don’t they wear frocks? I think they wear frocks.

What sort of story is this?

Turns out, one heck of a story. Over the course of a quarter-century, Langley’s auxiliary has given about $10 million to the hospital. They have a wildly successful thrift store in town, and they’re a beast of an organization, with more than 200 volunteers and a highly committed base whose roots go back at least a century, to volunteer organizations that preceded the hospital.

At first, we didn’t think a $1.5-million donation would grab much attention when we’d already announced $7 million in one fell swoop. We certainly didn’t think media would be very interested in telling the story of the auxiliary.

Like I said, it turned to be a heck of a story. We met Diane Thornton, the longtime past-president. And Thelma Boileau, the current president. Thelma and Diane. Thelma and Diane. Hmmmm, sounds almost familiar. A couple of driven, independent women.

And when I spoke to Diane, this was the first thing she told me: “We have changed. We’re no longer a bunch of little old ladies knitting toilet roll covers. We’ve come a long way.”

That sure made the pitch a whole lot easier. This isn’t the auxiliary you’ve got in your head, we said. This is a serious kick-ass bunch, who know what they want and get it. Who wouldn’t want to tell that story?

That’s exactly what happened. CBC and CKNW. The Province. Pretty much every TV station in town. All telling the story about this powerful, motivated, altruistic group.

And so, the simplest of reminders: Don’t judge a book by its cover. Or, uh, its toilet roll cover.

Tags: ,

June 7, 2018

Peak is looking for a Senior Account Executive!

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE OR ACCOUNT MANAGER — PR AND SOCIAL MEDIA

Peak Communicators Ltd is looking for an experienced public relations and social media professional to join its team in Vancouver.

Reporting to the Partners, the Senior Account Executive or Account Manager will lead accounts and be responsible for campaign development, account management, media relations, and social media.

Responsibilities

  • Campaign development:
    • Research and develop public relations and social media campaigns
    • Set campaign objectives, goals, tactics and metrics for measuring success
  • Account management:
    • Project-manage campaigns from start to finish
    • Manage campaign timelines and ensure deadlines are met
    • Act as daily client contact and client lead on accounts you’re responsible for
    • Be accountable for campaign results and ensure targets set are met
    • Manage campaign budgets
  • Media relations:
    • Write and/or edit campaign materials including news releases, fact sheets, biographies, pitch notes, etc.
    • Confidently pitch stories to media
    • Develop and maintain relationships with media relevant to clients
  • Social media:
    • Manage social media programs on behalf of clients
    • Develop high-quality and impactful content for social media platforms (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, Google+)
    • Measure the success of social media programs

 

Qualifications

  • Minimum of three years of relevant experience
  • Experience in a PR agency, journalism or a communications role in-house
  • Proven project management skills
  • Proven written and verbal communications skills
  • Proven evidence of executing social media campaigns
  • Excellent understanding of the media landscape in British Columbia specifically, as well as Canada as a whole
  • Proven editorial skills – and ability to delegate tactical assignments and accurately judge and edit the work of others
  • A bachelor’s degree in a relevant field from a college or university is required

If interested in applying, please send your résumé and cover letter to VancouverPR@peakco.com

Interviews will be held on a rolling basis and the successful candidate will begin immediately.  

Only those candidates shortlisted for an interview will be contacted. Thank you for your interest in working at Peak Communicators.

About Peak Communicators

Peak is the leading independent PR firm in Western Canada and has built a solid reputation in the field of communications and public relations. As a full-service PR agency with offices in Vancouver, Kelowna and Calgary, Peak has a wide-ranging roster of clients that span many industries including real estate, mining, retail, hospitality, finance, hi-tech, fitness and education. For more information, visit: www.peakco.com

May 10, 2018

Dig for the story, believe in the story: the Alzheimer Society of B.C.

You’re a fundraising organization and you’d like to draw attention to the events you’ve organized.

 

This won’t be easy.

 

If anything makes media yawn, it’s another charity doing another walk to raise money.

 

Whether that makes sense or is simply callous, it’s a fact. It’s exactly what happens in a newsroom – they get pitched pretty much every day about those sorts of initiatives, and are often invited to write about the event based on, frankly, uninspiring hooks.

 

There are so many of them, it’s understandable so many get deleted. It’s hard to tell one from another. And the excuse for not biting is an easy one: “We get these pitches every single day. If we’re going to say yes to one, we’re going to have to say yes to all of them.”

 

Look, you and I both know that’s not true. Media doesn’t have to say yes to all of them. But they’ll say yes if — and here’s the big if — there are compelling stories to tell.

 

So when our longtime client, the Alzheimer Society of B.C., asked us to pitch the 2018 Investors Group Walk for Alzheimer’s – 23 fundraising walks around the province on May 6 – we couldn’t help but feel challenged. The society planned to honour longtime volunteers, or others who’ve been impacted by Alzheimer’s, at each site. If you think charity events are a tough thing to pitch, how about volunteerism? In both cases, absolutely worthy. In both cases, media usually shrugs.

 

How, then, did we do it? By investing time. Effort. Delving into the subject. Getting to know people. And becoming emotionally involved with our client’s story.

 

The society wanted us to pitch Michele Buchignani and her parents, Reg and Sally. They were, no doubt, keen and experienced volunteers. Reg’s mother had had Alzheimer’s. Reg came to the society for help, for guidance. And 30 years later, he’s still giving his time. So is Michele, who’s had her boots on the ground as a volunteer as well as being the past chair of the board of directors.

 

We knew we needed more than the volunteer angle. So we invited Michele to Peak’s offices one Friday afternoon. We sat her down and said: “Tell us about your grandma. Take us back to when she was healthy. What was she like?” And just like that, Michele brought her grandma back to life. It was really something: funny in places, sad in others. Mary Buchignani was a strong woman of tremendous character and personality – and then she wasn’t. Michele learned a lot, watching her grandma’s long struggle with Alzheimer’s. It led to her getting involved, becoming an advocate.

 

After an hour in our boardroom, we knew we had at least one great story. We had someone with lived experience who had the personal story, but also could deliver the key messages – the walks, the fundraising, the need for increased awareness about and support for people with Alzheimer’s and their loved ones – in succinct and effective ways. Listening to Michele, we knew she would make a compelling TV or radio talk show guest.

 

From there, our task was simple: Sell Michele. And determine what the other best stories were. We had a planner from the City of New Westminster who’s not only been working on New West becoming B.C.’s first dementia-friendly community but also has a father who was recently diagnosed with Alzheimer’s; a couple who’ve had a long life together, filled with affection and love, and the disease won’t steal those things from them; and a 69-year-old woman, several years into her diagnosis, who decided she wanted to go skydiving. Fantastic stories of different types. All meaningful. All human.

 

We went into this project knowing it would be a challenge. But when we take on a project, we always find a way to get media results. It’s where Peak has earned its reputation. So we landed the major media, from the Vancouver Sun to Global TV to CBC Radio and CKNW. And the regional media, who told those powerful stories about people who live in their area. We had a client in the Alzheimer Society of B.C. that was passionate and communicative and positive, and we were able to help successfully convey their chief messages time and time again.

 

When it was all over, the event was behind us and we all knew so much more about Alzheimer’s, we were able to say to the client: We can keep getting you, and the work you’re doing, attention. And we don’t need the walk to do it.

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,